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The Conservatives and Brexit

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This isn't intended to be an argument for or against Brexit. Just an observation about the behaviour of the Tories prompted by Mrs May's repeated claims that she is trying to do what is best for the country. In fact, Brexit has always been about the Tories trying to hang on to power. Remember, Cameron felt compelled to offer the nation a referendum because the Tories were losing votes to UKIP and feared losing a general election. The referendum commitment was purely designed to stop that leak of votes the UKIP that would have let Labour back into government. Of course, the arrogant Cameron never really thought that the country would vote to leave. That gamble backfired big time and Cameron slinked away into the shadows. Thanks Dave. That was the first time that the Tories put themselves before the nation. The second of course was when the Tories hung on to power after the last election by doing a deal with the DUP to secure what really is a coalition majority. That made them beholdent to the DUP at a time when the Ulster border question was always going to be a major obstacle to overcome in Brexit negotiations. Once more, the Tories jeapordised the future prosperity of the country in order to protect their own desperate grip on power. Let's be clear, the Tory Party is the architect of the mess that Mrs May now claims to be trying to save us from 'in the best interests of the country' and they took us there purely because they put party before country in the first place - more than once.



-- Edited by smiler on Thursday 15th of November 2018 08:34:26 AM

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Brexit to me it's about giving the UK back to the UK. That's why the country voted to leave. Locally be same in other parts of the country it's just a dumping ground for East Europeans who've put nothing in, taking out. Living like gypsies. Politicians aren't bothered they never see it.

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The o/p was about the mess the Tories have made of the entire job while serving their own not the country's interests, not really an invitation to get a bit of racism out of your system. But if we have to be on the subject, I'd take a good 70 or 80% of the Eastern Europeans I've met who have made the decision to come here over the average brain dead mid to late aged white english male who voted leave to 'take the country back'.

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smiler agree some of our people are as bad. But look at parts of Sheffield & Rotherham. Rotherham town centre is a ghost town. I live close, never go there. You shouldn't be able to come into our country just straight on benefits. Use our National health system ect... If we went to another country & was taken badly they would leave you to die there unless you had health insurance. You sound like our politicians who don't care about the problems they cause being here & the cost. I voted to leave solely to sort immigration out.

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Immigrants to the UK are by an enormous margin net contributors to the UK economy. That is to say that (contrary to your first post in this thread) they contribute far more to the UK economy than they take from it. Far more. There is no correlation at all between the decline of the high street in towns like Rotherham and immigration. Blame Meadowhall, Parkgate, town planners, capitalism, bankers, politicians etc or more likely some sophisticated mix of them. Blaming immigrants for the ills of our society is just lazy racism borne of fear and/or ignorance. It's always easiest to blame people who are different and vulnerable isn't it? In fact without immigration our economy will not and can not generate the economic growth that we need to support our aging population. I repeat, immigrants are a massive net economic contributor. That might not suit your prejudices gwru but its a fact. If Brexit goes through, get ready for many years of economic decline. How will Rotherham town centre be looking then? The native English (is there is such a thing) who queue up to get into pubs at 9am or sit in town centres outside the charity and (ironically) betting shops will still be there - only in greater numbers - long after the Eastern Europeans have gone.

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I'll put it another way gwru. If the eastern Europeans leave town, do you seriously think that all the shops that we remember in the town centre from 30 years ago will all reopen? And the Odeon? Or that the town centre will be buzzing again on a Friday and Saturday night? Were the Poles responsible for Woolworths going bust? When the eastern Europeans close their shops on Wellgate what is going to replace them? Or will they just become empty? When you have had your way, what do you expect to see when you go for your long awaited walk into town?

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Won't change my views. Shouldn't be here unless they are contributing to being here. Before you say it quite a few of our own people aren't. That's this country's problem. Non British people aren't our problem.

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The immigration factor has always been a way of controlling the populace. For centuries governments have used the 'Johnny foreigner' and immigration as a way of keeping down wages while taking advantage of housing shortages to hike up profits from higher rents. the ensuing discontent is blamed on the bogie man to detract attention from the sculduggery of government.

I voted leave simply for democratic reasons as I see the EU as a corrupt totalitarian regime run by a bunch of get rich quick self serving cowboys. There is no democracy. We elect MEPs but their purpose is simply to rubber stamp the prospectus of the unelected commissioners. Also the way Greece was used and fiscally raped by the EU and now in effect owned by Germany and others is the worse obscenity of modern time; in this case it was blamed on the '****less Greeks' themselves. They also committed a crime against the Irish people when the European Central Bank put pressure on the Irish president to transfer the losses of, mainly German investors, to be put onto the books of the Irish state!!!! Surely that is a crime, isn't it. the Eu making the Irish people pay the losses of private investors in Greece? Is that working for a better Europe?

Also I am old enough to remember when we had a manufacturing industry, huge fishing fleets, and were self sufficient in energy. The downward spiral of the countries fortunes and decline in all our industry happened after we joined the the Common Market and we were subjected to quotas which ravaged the steel industry and fisheries. Strangely enough Germany and France' industries did not suffer. They still have productive steel works, build cars, and design and build aircraft. The Germans still make Dorniers for heavens sake. From being a World leader we now make almost nothing. A low skilled, low waged economy, which has to buy in rather than export and make money.

But back to the main topic. The Brexit negotiations have been a farce from start to finish. It was designed to be complex and protracted and also damaging to the country in order to put off any other countries from leaving the federation. There was no way we were going to be allowed a fair and proper deal; the EU has shown its true colour by its mean, spiteful and unhelpful attitude expressed publicly, expressly to frighten and punish us.

Smiler is right to say that Cameron expected us to vote to remain otherwise we wouldn't have been granted a say in it. I was shocked the friday morning after the referendum but said to Towdlass that they would not allow us to leave. One way or another it would be in name only. Yanis Varoufakis, has described it as the Hotel California…You can check out anytime you like, but you can never leave. It seems that is the way it is to be.

I don't pretend to understand the minutiae of the deal, frankly I'm bored with it, confident in the knowledge that our democratic choice will be overridden. The Tories are in complete melt down and desperately clinging to power and when the deal is put before Parliament its my guess that it will be endorsed by MPs (most of whom are 'Remainers' in any case) and supported by many Blairite Labour members. This is because to vote it down would surely have to trigger another General Election with the possibility of a Labour victory, and we can't have that can we. So again I agree with smiler that the Tories are simply trying to cling to power and probably going to drag the country down with them….and then blame the other bogie man Jeremy Corbyn,

The answer to Smiler is simply to say that all Government puts party and self interest before the country except perhaps the 1945 Labour Government. Government are lobbied, influenced and funded and bribed, by big wealthy organisations. You cannot run a country for the benefit of all based on market forces. We only have to look at the collapse of Corillian costing the tax payer at least £148m and goodness knows how many jobs, peoples lives being wrecked. Its always the ordinary people who pay the price, as we pay for austerity we didn't cause, unless you want to blame the Poles of course.



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I enjoyed reading your post Towdlad. Its good to have you back on the site posting regularly. I personally favoured remaining because I think the economic damage caused by leaving will be enormous, and possibly catastrophic. And whilst I see that the EU is be autocratically top heavy I held the view from my perspective as a lawyer and a bit of a socialist that the EU rather than the national government has been responsible for most of the good legislation that we have seen in this country in the last twenty years (particularly employment and consumer protection) that has improved the lot of the working man/woman. But I am certainly not massively in favour of the EU. It definitely has substantial faults. I can happily respect the views of people who voted to leave for well intentioned reasons. I was on the fence a bit myself until late in the campaign. What I don't like are (1) the fact that a good proportion of people voted to leave motivated by casual, ignorant racism when really Brexit and immigration are barely connected at all (net migration between us and fellow EU countries is negligible quite apart from the economic arguments in favour of it) and (2) that an issue so important to the future of the country is being used as a vehicle for personal and party ambition. If ever there was a time for some consensus, cross party politics this should have been it, but we have seen and are seeing parties and individuals scrambling around opportunistically and fiddling while Rome is burning. Its been a shameful episode from start to finish.

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I voted to stop in the reason being everybody who argued to stay or leave agreed nothing would change over immigration 2 years later we have got a government who couldn't run a chip shop and with the prospect of lord snooty and his gang taking control. I'm no fan of the Tories but Mrs May's the best of a bad bunch I will give her some credit no matter what happens she carries on I agree with Towdlad when it comes to a vote in parliament my guess it could be a free vote with the two choices this deal being the least of two evils. I see the the boss of Rolls Royce has come out in favour of this deal big business could play a part in changing some MP's minds.



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I'm a hard line Brexiteer, but it appears there are not only major divisions in the Cons party, but most parties (apart from the DUP), and the population as a whole. It just seems a bit crazy despite my views that when what 17m voted out and 15m voted remain? that to me is the slimmest of margins really & its such a hard position to stick to the code and morals of democarcy while pleasing as much as she can from both camps. May can't win, I actually feel sorry for her in a way, we have zero bargaining tools when it comes to negotiating and I do admire how she's sticking to the democratic side that 'the country has already spoken when ref a 'peoples vote' (although it's more than possible a lot of Brexiteers seeing now what's on the table would think staying is better than a bad or no deal?). With regards a peoples vote, so we have the details of a bad deal, we know what it will be like to revoke A50, the only information we don't have is what will happen if we go for no deal, will it be painful then prosper? or will it knock X percent from our GDP and shrink it forevermore? I can't vote in such a vote when I don't know the answer to this. I agree with above though how it's been handled, its a farce we're now on our 3rd Brexit Secretary, it must look to the EU and the World that we're falling apart, when really (as per my views), I wanted at this stage for us to be decisive, to appear strong when really we've become a laughing stock. But this IS May's fault and it started with the snap election to try and get a bigger majority that majorly backfired. But (I know the bad deal can't be changed), if the back stop was removed from the issue and a date put on it other than 20XX the deal looks like we can swallow it? - I can't believe whoever signed off on that thought it would acceptable to anybody in any kind of way. In fact its that bad that the conspiracy theorist in me says its part of a grand plan to revoke A50 have another referendum and ultimately stay in the EU?

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I said the day after the referendum that we would not leave the EU, I even posted the same on here. I didn't know of course how it was going to be done or when but it was as plain as a pike staff we were not going to be allowed to opt out, democracy or no.

The present situation with the Tory party is of a preordained ruse. Its obvious now that the EU was going to be bullish and its my guess with British assent, since the establishment clearly wanted to remain. Enter 'Operation Obstruction and Fear' making sure the whole process will be long winded, complicated and unworkable and descend into chaos designed to make the whole bag of mashings unworkable, resulting in a second referendum as Exeter says and this time the remainders will win. They will win because the remain camp got organised immediately after the results; they are funded and bank rolled by the likes of Blair and other big organisations here and abroad. And don't think there isn't plenty of big goings on behind the scenes to promote it.

They will win because they are organised and the Brexiteers are getting fed up with it and resigned to the fact we are going to be shafted, just as the Danish were told to think again when they voted against the Maastricht Treaty; three times they were told to vote again until they got the vote Brussels wanted. In addition to Ireland being told to vote again both on the Nice and Lisbon Treaties; being 're-educated' on the consequences between each vote. Strange how we sneer and even bomb other Countries in order to impose freedom and democracy while at the same time the EU:-

"For all their concerns with global competitiveness, migration and terrorism, only one prospect truly terrifies the Powers of Europe: Democracy! They speak in democracy’s name but only to deny, exorcise and suppress it in practice. They seek to co-opt, evade, corrupt, mystify, usurp and manipulate democracy in order to break its energy and arrest its possibilities."

Enter Brexit

The above quote is from the manifesto of the European Spring movement and I sincerely hope that the momentum being built up by the movement can succeed in engineering reform within the EU itself, otherwise we are all going to be really done for without us realising it

/diem25.org/tag/european-spring/

If any of you guys are really interested in freedom and democracy as I am, I strongly urge you to check out the link. It may even change the mind of a few remainers.

Last thing I remember, I was
Running for the door
I had to find the passage back to the place I was before
'Relax' said the night man,
'We are programmed to receive.
You can check out any time you like,
But you can never leave!'

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Have got to agree again with Towdlad we are being set up or softened up for another referendum. As I said in an earlier post I voted to stay I but I have accepted the vote to leave just get on with it. Look at that Dominic Rabb another career politician only interested in his next move what a dream team he would make with Boris Johnson as leader also Rees Mogg in charge of Social Security Lord Snooty could sort us wasters out bring back the workhouse. If Mrs May survives this leadership challenge and they can't get rid of her for another year call the Moggites bluff if they won't vote for her deal call an election and try and get this deal through by winning it. One good thing about that deal nobody get's what they want. As the old Rolling Stones song goes you can't always get what you want but sometimes you get what you get.



-- Edited by TH MILLER on Sunday 18th of November 2018 12:36:41 PM

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There is no such thing as “no deal” between the UK and the soon-to-be rump EU.
In the absence of a bi-lateral UK-EU trade agreement after Brexit, two-way trade between the UK and the Continent will continue, perfectly legally, on World Trade Organisation (WTO) terms.
At Bretton Woods in 1944, the UK (whose delegation included John Maynard Keynes) was one of 23 founder-countries of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, which morphed into the WTO in 1995. The WTO currently has more than 160 member-countries. Today, 74 years after Bretton Woods, global customs duties (which are levied only on cross-border trade in goods: trade in services is tariff-free) average a little over one per cent of the underlying value of the goods traded.
HM Revenue & Customs, one of the most efficient customs bodies in the world, assesses the bulk of duties electronically, that is to say remotely: not at Dover, Felixstowe or other ports. Other developed countries’ customs bodies also assess duties remotely.
The US has no deal (free trade agreement) with the EU. China has no deal (free trade agreement) with the EU. Yet, though neither country is a member of the EU, both export more goods to continental EU than the UK.
Immediately after Brexit, it is probable that the UK will trade with the EU on the basis of “no deal”, without a specific UK-EU trade agreement. If, post-Brexit, the UK and the EU conclude that a specific bilateral free trade agreement is in their interests, they can set one up.

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Latest I've heard Corbins been at No 10 measuring new curtains and been seen seen outside shouting taxi for Mrs May.

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I think there may be too much fear and thus complication. This democracy thing is much valued but its also not really what it says on the tin.

Whether I have had many lives before or not, it is still probably the best time to be alive. It has to be said that for westerners the last 70 years has been a relative paradise. I dont equate that precisely with the EU , but there is something about alliances and none more powerful than financial and trade ties. Even so, it may not be as powerful as ideas of self-preservation in other forms. Nationalism, cultural identity, language, general features of creatures, and old blood ties are perhaps more powerful.

There really shouldn't be any problem with a country voting, which is by far the most civilised way of doing things , and then in good faith the Governance of the country or tribe or whatever goes into action on behalf of the majority. Of course, Im just kidding.

It never ever has happened like that. Sadly, its a myth, and as Towldlad has said beautifully we are constantly corrupted, confused, confined, and crippled. Democracy does this! But, its the best of a whole load of evil that can be visited on humans by other humans.

We have so many examples of the failings of democracy that it should be obvious that its a very broken and sometimes very Evil organisational tool. Indeed, its very difficult to judge the merits of democracy without endless wading through the history of humankind and disappearing up one's own bottom.

I voted to leave based on my instinct that the EU is a tyrant. It takes more than it gives. It is entirely unconnected and unrelated to the idea of democracy. It is very dirty and purposely obstructive. It is not a democracy. It is a centralised form of power. very centralised. It is not representative. It is very scary. It is very far removed from the people. It is very close to the behemoth of 1984. Very close.

I would ove to continue to see Europeans come and live here and brighten up our sometimes dull cultural lifes. Much is lost with the passing of time and new blood and ideas are welcome. However, it seems that this monster wont let us have a variety of views and tastes. It seems also that most wantonly continue to express the view that this is a black and white issue. I think the truth is that people voted the way they did for their own reasons and that I think should be upheld.

I doubt the world will come to an end or our country perishes, but some may indeed lose their jobs. Uncomfortably, many British people have already lost their jobs due to immigration. This is after all how life itself works. There cannot be two people where once there was one doing the same job. In many parts of the country, this probably has driven down wages, resulting in job losses and a huge pain.

So, I think I have to confess that I like most people cannot foresee the pros and cons of Brexit. I don't want anyone to suffer because of my vote or ignorance, but I am as ignorant as most others and my vote was in good faith. Now the vote has been done that same ignorance suggests to me that the country and indeed the world will be much better off if democracy is seen to be honoured. After all, the tide will keep rolling and moeny and power will continue to war with the better human instincts. One way or another the powerful will rise and fall and take many innocnets with them, but, this should be , at least , a time for the bare and undiluted voice of a peoples to be upheld. If we cant honour this basic expression then we are might truly be said to be nothing but individually corrupt and dishonourable.


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Very eloquent Ian if I may say so, but I must respectfully take issue with something that you slipped in there almost as a given when in fact it doesn't hold water. That is the old 'they are taking our jobs' argument ie you can't give two people the same job. That falls down on several basic levels. Firstly, there are many jobs that UK residents don't want or that we can't train enough people to do. The good people out near Boston don't like Johnny Foreigner because their picking industry draws in immigrants, so they voted firmly for Brexit. Ironically businesses out there are panicking about Brexit and begging the government to still allow casual workers in seasonally because they won't be able to produce without them. Similarly bosses and unions alike in the NHS are screaming from the rooftops about the fact that without immigration we are going to have a massive (hundreds of thousands massive) shortfall of skilled and semi skilled workers in the NHS. Secondly, you mustn't forget that there are many Brits who choose to go and live and work in the EU who will presumably now be looking for work here in the future instead. It is a two way street. Thirdly, we need growth at a faster rate than we have it now to create economic activity to pay for the health and social care to support our increasingly aging population. Without immigration our economy will stagnate, and either those in work will all have to pay much more tax or those who need health and social care but can't afford to pay for it will have to go without. Whilst we could have a discussion about the quality of jobs being created, and I know that there are hotspots, and these things need addressing, high unemployment hasn't been a serious issue in the UK in the last twenty years has it? I wouldn't have minded a vote for Brexit if I thought that it had been made for the right reasons, but there is no doubt that for very many people (not all and I am not tarring all Brexiteers with the same brush) the Brexit vote became a referendum on immigration and they voted for Brexit because Johnson Farage etc appealed to a base dislike of immigrants that was/is fuelled by exactly the sort of 'they are taking our jobs' sound bite that extremists have been using for years to whip up support. In actual fact, its nonsense and in the short to medium term economically very damaging to the same people (largely white working classes in places like Rotherham) who fell for it. When our economy shrinks and suffers it won't be the privileged who can afford to pay for things who will suffer, will it? It will be them.

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Yes, I was indeed thinking of the fens and surrounding district. I have no first-hand evidence of working or living in these more rural and essential areas of mainly manual and supported economies. I did infer from the strength of the vote that there must be some actual real hard-lived experience of locals not being able to find casual work, which they would have relied on for years. Indeed, I know this might be very true based on the people I meet every day who mainly work in service industries. Some of those are seasonal and they rely on 2-3 jobs at a time to make up tax credits. It must be an absolute nightmare to watch your income go up and down each month especially with children and the many depressed parents and single parent families. I can understand the vitriol and I do think some of it must be true. Ironically, many of the Eastern Europeans I know live in exactly the same manner; Heavily in debt, relying on tax credits and under immense stress with young children-welcome to the dream!

I do wonder what it means to say someone is a net contributor. I will be honest, I think I may have met one person in my entire life who might fit that description. Whatever makes the world go round is not down to the direct work of the many, but the exploitation by the few. I can't think of an individual job that doesn't take more than it rightly earns ( much of the issues that confront us are greed and suspicion born from that insecurity). I suspect it is like the way people think of God. Someone, somewhere and somehow set it all running and now we just suffer, exploit and dream in it, thinking and attributing all acts and actions as belonging to us. Monopoly the board game?

History shouts loud, and this changing hegemony has been true of Britain quite uniquely for perhaps 5,000 years or so: Given our geography, fantastic agricultural conditions, waters, the shifting of the climate (that eventually partially sealed us off from the continent several thousand years ago) we have always had a more than peculiar relationship to others. Indeed, I think it might be true to say that Britannia changed hands more than any other protectorate during the several hundred years of Roman occupation, and rule. After this, we had Saxons, Vikings and Normans. During our Naval conquest, Britain did more than any other nation to advance trade and cultural "exchange". The size and breadth of the Commonwealth is still a testament to that. Then, there is our unique and unequalled role on the side of democracy over the last 200 years. While Russia suffered greatly none did more to uphold teh political idea of freedom than Britain. This I believe to be self-evident from easily accessed historical data. We can even chuck in our own brutal "modern" civil war that was fought once again because of outside interference. So, I do eye with suspicion the latest attempt to conquer Europe. I dont think this statement can be rightly regarded as xenophobic, or nationalistic. I think its a hard fact, and it is been paid for with bitter and devastated lives.

It is only a point of view (albeit a very serious one with serious consequences) that shifts between the dream of continued wealth and freedom, and the hell that conflict brings. I don't say this with great confidence, but I suppose that a more centralised and powerful Europe will be too tempting for our fragile and competitive human nature to hold in balance. It is just a point of view and one that has to be judged alongside the continued idea of individual nations, local decision-makers and a decentralised but national decision-making body. All these things are and will continue to slip away from our doorsteps. One only has to look at the previous way the right to express has been charged down by Brussels and none more graphically in recent times than in Spain. On that note, Britain once again was able to display its unique position when Scotland voted to remain part of the union. Something, unique and disallowed if Europe has its way. Europe is not a domesticated animal. I believe it has a ferocious will and only respects power. We don't need another superpower...do we?

I don't doubt for one moment that the economy will be hit if we leave and some will directly suffer significantly.

I also would like to see continued free movement. However, I cannot support a European superstate. And this is clearly where the powers that be want us to go. This is one point that those radical agitators what to muddy. Manywelcomee immigration, but not the control of it by a few who grow fat and rich and idle. It is not any different than the great and eventually hugely bloated Senate. There will be a Cesar and after that many, many more- I must admit he is somewhat of a hero of mine, however!

The power that Europe (whatever that is) exercisers over millions of -consumers- otherwise disparate and disenfranchised souls is so great that the rhetoric largely goes unchallenged. Indeed, the stranglehold they have over universities and social norms is staggering. It will only take one more move and we will have that president of Europe. But, of course, that would be a very human and egoic mistake to make. Then the game would be up. For now, the world is in fear of Trump when I would suggest they need to be worrying about the shadows of Brussels.

P.S. I apologise for going wildly off topic. I have never voted conservative and doubt I could. I do withold my vote however. So, I dont think that Brexit is entirely a conservative theme. It is just that the other (non-representative would be governers) have stifled and controlled the electorate (haha) in their particular ways. One only need look at ones local labour council over the last 20 plus years to see the fear they terrorise some folks with. I would think that the labour vote and the working class Tory vote clinched the result. Funnily, there are still 17 million eligible voting adults who don't seem to think they are particularly happy with the state of things. I wonder why the opposing 17 million eligible voting people opted to "stay happy"? Perhaps only those who feel they are at the table already voted for a European state!?



-- Edited by ian on Sunday 30th of December 2018 09:00:03 PM

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I can't speak to your anecdotal experience Ian. I am going on figures provided by the NFU, agriculture industry spokespeople and DEFRA (none of them particularly radical groups) who say that 1-2% of seasonal workers are UK citizens and that (more tellingly) only 1-2% of all applicants for the work are UK citizens. The Brexit vote has had an impact already. It is reliably estimated that 30-35% of the UK soft fruit crop in 2018 was left to rot because the numbers of EU migrant workers willing to come here fell away and there was no increase in the number of UK residents willing to do the work. Industry representatives are begging the government to make special provision post Brexit to allow EU citizens to still be allowed to come over for the seasonal work. They say that if that is not allowed, they may have to broaden their net to attract workers from places around the works more distant than eastern Europe. The NHS will be on its knees unless something is done quickly to replace immigrant workers. According to the Nursing and Midwifery Council we have about 5 years to fund the training of many tens of thousands of nurses and midwives and that process needed to have started before now to be ready in time. Its a Ricking time bomb. The argument that 'they are taking our jobs' has been used since the very first migrant worker took a job centuries ago. It has been used to fuel the prejudices of those who fear what they don't know or who (worse) want to hate people who aren't like them. But it has always been a completely false argument that has never been supported by fact, truth or hard economics. It is as much a lie now as it has ever been.

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Wonderful words, however the irony of it all. Foreign Migrants working in the UK rural areas and the huge numbers of our home grown indigenous population unable to get on to the property ladder in the places of their birth due to property developers buying up cottages and houses and turning them into overly priced second homes for some well shod city folk, many of the latter probably developing diarrhoea in the process should the UK actually exit the EU.


Many ordinary French citizens have now seen the light and taken to the streets of several towns and cities across France in protest over the austerity measures implemented by Macron and his cohorts after they were parachuted in by the Establishment to bring about change. I like how the word 'change' is often used by politicians to appease the masses. Change to what? Change for the bus fare?


What do the majority of UK people do when they feel that they are being shafted by a government who promised change? Take to social media and grumble. The UK Establishment must be wetting themselves at our inability to take direct action. My guess is that the majority of UK MPs don't want us to leave the EU.

If they, the UK MPs, dare to think about staying in the EU and vote in favour of Theresa May's deal I'm sure there'll be many taking to the streets in protest. I'm sure the populace will be better mobilised than in 1848 when several European governments had to act very quickly to appease their respective subjects.

The EU deal being touted by Theresa May was negotiated by some Senior Civil Servants, one of whom is called Ollie Robins. He was the one that stayed out of camera shot when May last visited Brussels and received nothing further from Juncker and Co. May is unable to speak without a script. It is a well known fact the she is briefed 'within an inch of her life' before she goes and speaks before an audience.


As for another Andrea Leadsom Government Minister, the Leader of the House of Commons. She made a Freudian slip when asked by a TV reporter about the current EU withdrawal agreement currently on the table. This was when the idea of a no deal Brexit was being bandied about. She was rather quick to reply that there was going to be 'no Brexit. She then tried to recover her faux pas by saying something like 'no deal' as she hurried away to her chauffeur driven car. Ms Leadsom was one of my idols but now my idol has feet of clay.


Change anyone?









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